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Minister of Foreign Affairs

Linas Linkevičius

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Lithuania signs agreement on status of associate member state of CERN

Created: 2017.06.27 / Updated: 2017.06.27 14:08
      Lithuania signs agreement on status of associate member state of CERN
      Lithuania signs agreement on status of associate member state of CERN
      Lithuania signs agreement on status of associate member state of CERN
      Lithuania signs agreement on status of associate member state of CERN

      On 27 June, the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Lithuania Linas Linkevičius and the CERN Director-General, Dr. Fabiola Gianotti, who arrived in Lithuania with a delegation of the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), signed an agreement between Lithuania and CERN, granting the status of an associate member state of CERN to the country. Lithuania will become the fifth associate member state  of CERN and, thus, will join the organization that has 22 member states and hosts about 12,000 scientists.

      Lithuania’s Foreign Minister said that “Lithuania’s new status of an associate member state of the organisation is important for the implementation of Lithuania’s foreign policy goals, as it will contribute to the country’s successful economic and social development and technological progress”.

      Lithuania will cooperate with CERN in the areas of science and research, education, business and healthcare. The agreement between Lithuania and CERN, granting the status of an associate member state to the country, will allow Lithuanian scientists to participate in CERN research programs and  activities of its management bodies. It will also open up additional job and internship opportunities for graduate students, students and young researchers at CERN. In addition, Lithuanian companies will be able to participate in CERN procurements.

      During the new phase in Lithuania-CERN relations in the medium term, we aim at strengthening the Lithuanian team of scientists, engineers and information technology specialists. The Lithuanian team that complies with international science and technology standards would participate in large international science and technology projects in the fields of physics, radiobiology, medicine and nuclear physics. The associate membership will also boost innovation, economic growth and competitiveness, and the creation of new jobs.

      Lithuania started to cooperate with CERN scientists in 1990, while a cooperation agreement was signed in 2004. The agreement provides for the development of scientific and technical cooperation in the field of high-energy physics. The country opened talks on the associate membership in 2016 after the President of  Lithuania Dalia Grybauskaitė and the CERN Director-General Gianotti had met to discuss partnership conditions. The associate membership is directly linked to the membership of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), as this organization places particular emphasis on innovation and competitiveness.

      Established in 1954 near Geneva, Switzerland, in collaboration with visionary scholars and diplomats, CERN employs the most gifted scientists in the planet, who carry out unique experiments that can change the future of mankind. Today, the organization uses the world’s most advanced, sophisticated, and most complex scientific instruments to solve the mysteries of the microcosm. CERN operates 170 data centres in 40 countries of the world with 2 million jobs. The organization explored the Big Bang theory. In addition, CERN has built the world’s largest particle accelerator and discovered the Higgs boson. A scientist at CERN Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web in 1989 and developed the first website.

       

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